Directions for writing an editorial on the industrial revolution

Mary Anne Kahler Subject Area:

Directions for writing an editorial on the industrial revolution

It reflects the majority vote of the editorial board, the governing body of the newspaper made up of editors and business managers.

It is usually unsigned. Much in the same manner of a lawyer, editorial writers build on an argument and try to persuade readers to think the same way they do.

Editorials are meant to influence public opinion, promote critical thinking, and sometimes cause people to take action on an issue. In essence, an editorial is an opinionated news story. Introduction, body and conclusion like other news stories 2. An objective explanation of the issue, especially complex issues 3.

A timely news angle 4. Opinions from the opposing viewpoint that refute directly the same issues the writer addresses 5. The opinions of the writer delivered in a professional manner. Good editorials engage issues, not personalities and refrain from name-calling or other petty tactics of persuasion.

Alternative solutions to the problem or issue being criticized. Anyone can gripe about a problem, but a good editorial should take a pro-active approach to making the situation better by using constructive criticism and giving solutions.

directions for writing an editorial on the industrial revolution

A solid and concise conclusion that powerfully summarizes the writer's opinion. Give it some punch. Four Types of Editorials Will: Editors often use these editorials to explain the way the newspaper covered a sensitive or controversial subject.

School newspapers may explain new school rules or a particular student-body effort like a food drive. These editorials constructively criticize actions, decisions or situations while providing solutions to the problem identified. Immediate purpose is to get readers to see the problem, not the solution.

Editorials of persuasion aim to immediately see the solution, not the problem. From the first paragraph, readers will be encouraged to take a specific, positive action. Political endorsements are good examples of editorials of persuasion. These editorials commend people and organizations for something done well.

They are not as common as the other three. Writing an Editorial 1. Pick a significant topic that has a current news angle and would interest readers. Collect information and facts; include objective reporting; do research 3.

State your opinion briefly in the fashion of a thesis statement 4. Explain the issue objectively as a reporter would and tell why this situation is important 5. Give opposing viewpoint first with its quotations and facts 6.

Refute reject the other side and develop your case using facts, details, figures, quotations. Pick apart the other side's logic.During the Industrial Revolution, new directions of science were taken, new ways of life were started, and new technologies were invented and these positive result of industrialization outweighed the pains it brought upon the people and environment.

With science taking a new direction, people became healthier as vaccines, pasteurization.

Why wind energy is flawed – Wind Turbine Syndrome

Directions for Writing an Editorial on the Industrial Revolution 1. You will assume that role of an English journalist in to write an editorial in. Dear Twitpic Community - thank you for all the wonderful photos you have taken over the years.

We have now placed Twitpic in an archived state. I am writing to express my objections to the installation of Industrial Wind Turbines in Clearview Township, Ontario, Canada.

directions for writing an editorial on the industrial revolution

My wife and I moved here to retire on 50 acres, building a house, market garden, as well as taking many other initiatives to become part of the vital social fabric. Directions: Read this brief overview for an introduction to the Industrial Revolution. Click on the underlined words for the definitions.

Click on the underlined words for the definitions. Then after completing the reading, take the quiz. Lesson Procedure. In order to establish background, students will be introduced to the causes and effects of the Industrial Revolution. Students will then critically analyze primary source materials with the help of organizers and teacher-guided questions, developing additional questions to support their own inquiry.

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